Archive for the Economy Category

The evidence is in from across the Atlantic, and tax cuts benefit everyone

The evidence is in from across the Atlantic, and tax cuts benefit everyone

From discussions on how the UK should reform its tax and regulatory landscape to make the most of post-Brexit opportunities, to the rallies midterm election candidates have been holding across the US championing or lambasting the President’s tax cuts, the debate is still raging about how changes

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John McDonnell’s ideology won’t lead Britain to a bright new future, but to the dismal 1970s

John McDonnell’s ideology won’t lead Britain to a bright new future, but to the dismal 1970s

The focus this week has been on Philip Hammond’s Budget. The opinions of the shadow chancellor have been rather in the background by comparison. But John McDonnell is doing us all a favour at the moment. He is busily promoting a collection of essays which he edited,

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At long last, economists appreciate that private debt was the catalyst for the crisis

At long last, economists appreciate that private debt was the catalyst for the crisis

This month saw the tenth anniversary of the collapse of Lehman Brothers, a collapse which precipitated one of the only two global financial crises of the past 150 years. The late 2000s and early 1930s were the only periods in time when capitalism itself has trembled on

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Unemployment down, GDP up – there’s no logic for a public spending boost now

Unemployment down, GDP up – there’s no logic for a public spending boost now

Despite the warmth of the days, there is a distinct autumn feel to the mornings. And in the autumn, thoughts begin to turn to the Budget. Speculation has already begun about what the chancellor Philip Hammond might or might not do. For Labour, recent weeks have been

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The UK’s capacity to innovate matters far more than panic over consumer spending

The UK’s capacity to innovate matters far more than panic over consumer spending

The debate about Brexit has become mired in a virtually incomprehensible quagmire of detailed and technical negotiations between the UK and the rest of the EU. Yet the campaign itself in 2016 was dominated by broader questions of political economy. In addition to the hurly burly of

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Investors should intervene to stop high executive pay, before the regulator does

Investors should intervene to stop high executive pay, before the regulator does

Shareholder discontent over executive pay continues to rise. Last week, the outgoing boss of BT, Gavin Patterson, was in the firing line. At the company’s annual general meeting, 34 per cent of investors voted against the remuneration report, which included a £1.3m bonus payment to Patterson. Concern

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Mark Carney has bigger things to worry about than meaningless Brexit forecasts

Mark Carney has bigger things to worry about than meaningless Brexit forecasts

The governor of the Bank of England, Mark Carney, is up to his usual tricks. Last week, he claimed in front of the Treasury Committee of the House of Commons that British households are now more than £900 worse off after the vote to leave the EU.

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Brussels elites who fiddled while Rome burned may soon get their comeuppance

Brussels elites who fiddled while Rome burned may soon get their comeuppance

The new Italian government looks set to cause shock waves across Europe. The two parties promise mass deportations of immigrants and huge increases in public spending. Both the social and the economic policies of the Italian coalition clash directly with those of the European Commission, and Germany

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Trump’s tariffs are unlikely to plunge the global economy into a Great Depression

Trump’s tariffs are unlikely to plunge the global economy into a Great Depression

The Trojans had to beware of Greeks bearing gifts. In the same way, politicians need to be suspicious of petitions signed by economists. The vast majority of the UK economics profession backed Project Fear, which predicted a rise in unemployment of half a million by the end

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Our automated future is brighter than Karl Marx or Mark Carney would ever suggest

Our automated future is brighter than Karl Marx or Mark Carney would ever suggest

Mark Carney, the governor of the Bank of England, hit the headlines at the weekend, claiming that Marxism could once again become a prominent political force in the west. Automation, it seems, may not just destroy millions of jobs. For all except a privileged minority of high-tech

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