Dump opinion polls for social media to understand people’s real preferences

So the pollsters got it wrong again.  After the general election last year and then Brexit, it is perhaps not surprising.  What is surprising is just how wrong they were.  The real problem is the enormous confidence with which they pronounced that Clinton would win.

The Princeton Election Consortium was probably top of the class, stating that Clinton had a 98 to 99 per cent chance of winning.  Even the top Bayesian statistician, Nate Silver, who shot to fame by calling all 50 states correctly in 2012, gave Hillary a 71.4 per cent probability of victory.

Economists have been suspicious of opinions elicited by surveys for a long time.  A fundamental concept in economic theory is that of “revealed preference”.  The idea goes back much further than Adam Smith, the 18th century founder of modern economics.  In the Bible, we find the phrase “by their deeds, ye shall know them”.  In other words, it is not what people say what matters, it is what they do.  If someone says repeatedly that he prefers Pepsi to Coke, but never buys Pepsi and always buys Coke, we can reasonably infer that, despite his words, he does in fact prefer Coke.  His actions reveal his preference.

Readers above a certain age will recall the 1980s. Then, pollster after pollster reported that public opinion was firmly in favour of both more public spending, and higher taxes to pay for it.  Yet in election after election, voters just as firmly returned Mrs Thatcher and the Conservatives to power. They revealed a preference for lower spending and lower taxes.

A great deal of environmental policy is guided by hypothetical questions in surveys of what people would be willing to pay to, say, preserve a species of newt or prevent an oil spillage.  This approach even has its own name, that of “contingent valuation”.  Peter Diamond is an MIT economist who has won the Nobel Prize.   Jerry Hausman, also of MIT, might very well get one.  Referring to a paper they co-authored in the early 1990s, in 2012 Hausman wrote “at the time Peter’s view was that contingent valuation was hopeless.  I was merely dubious.  But 20 years later, after millions of dollars of government funded research, I have concluded that Peter was correct”.

A fundamental problem is that people overstate how much they would be willing to pay in such surveys, compared to how much they will pay when they really have to – just like the British electorate in the 1980s.

A great deal of expertise has been built up over the years in how to put together carefully constructed surveys to find out what voters and consumers think.  But their useful life is at an end.  Instead, social media conversations have the potential to discover what people really do prefer.  For all their chaotic and often incoherent nature, these unstructured conversations can reveal what people really are thinking and doing.  Economists, with their concept of revealed preference, need to make common cause with computer scientists.

Paul Ormerod

As published in City AM on Wednesday 15th November

Image: Trump with supporters by Gage Skidmore licensed under CC BY 2.0

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ALEX O’BYRNE

Associate

e: aobyrne@volterra.co.uk
t: +44 020 8878 6333

Alex O’Byrne, Associate at Volterra, is an experienced economic consultant specialising in economic, health and social impact, economic strategy, project appraisal and socio-economic planning matters.

Alex has led the socio-economic and health assessments of some of the most high profile developments across the UK, including Battersea Power Station, Olympia London, London Resort, MSG Sphere and Westfield. He has significant experience inputting to EIAs and s106 discussions as well as drafting economic statements, employment and skills strategies and affordable workspace strategies.

Alex is also experienced at economic appraisal for infrastructure. He was project manager of the economic appraisal for the City Centre to Mangere Light Rail in Auckland. He also led the economic and financial appraisals of the third tranche of the Transport Access Program for Transport for New South Wales, in which Alex developed and employed innovative methodological approaches to better capture benefits for individuals with reduced mobility.

He is interested in the limitations of current appraisal methodologies and ways of improving economic and health analysis to ensure it is accessible to as many people as possible. To this end, Alex recognises the importance of transparent and simple to understand analysis and ensuring all work is supported by a robust narrative.

Alex holds a BSc (Hons) in Economics from the University of Manchester and he was a member of the first cohort of the Mayor’s Infrastructure Young Professionals Panel.

ELLIE EVANS

Senior Partner

e: eevans@volterra.co.uk
t: +44 020 8878 6333

Ellie is a partner at Volterra, specialising in the economic impact of developments and proposals, and manages many of the company’s projects on economic impact, regeneration, transport and development.

With thirteen years experience at Volterra delivering high quality projects to clients across the public and private sector, Ellie has expertise in developing methods of estimating economic impact where complex issues exist with regards to deadweight, displacement and additionality.

Ellie has significant experience in estimating the economic impact across all types of property development including residential, leisure, office and mixed use schemes.

Project management of recent high profile schemes include the luxury hotel London Peninsula, Battersea Power Station and the Nova scheme at London Victoria. Ellie has also led studies across the country estimating the economic and regeneration impact of proposed transport investments, including studies on HS2 and Crossrail.

Ellie holds a degree in Mathematics and Economics from the University of Cambridge.