Archive for the Paul Ormerod Category

Gresham’s Law in Education: How the Bad Drove Out the Good

Young adults in England have scored almost the lowest result in the developed world in international literacy and numeracy tests. A study by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) shows how England’s 16 to 24 year olds are falling behind their Asian and European counterparts.

Read more

Russia: how the crisis might affect future growth

The performance of the BRIC economies over the past decade or so has been mixed. Russian growth, though impressive by Western standards, has lagged that of both India and China. This is particularly true since 2008. I got an insight into the problem at a conference last

Read more

Everything is crystal clear with hindsight

Are government bonds risky? This question arose a year ago, during a meeting with my bank. I wanted a low risk portfolio, but they noted that I did not want to hold UK government bonds. Whether it was the regulator who was insisting, or whether it was

Read more

Should London be an Independent City State?

Forget Scottish independence – in his blog for  the Guardian this week Larry Elliot suggests that it is London that should devolve – a move he says that would bring an economic boost to the rest of the UK. He quotes some findings from our own Paul

Read more

Alibaba: not just the Forty Thieves. China at the Cutting Edge

In the whole of the 20th century, only a few countries managed to transform themselves and join the club of rich economies. Japan is the most prominent example. The key question for the first half of the 21st century is whether or not China will manage to do the

Read more

Is the ‘rent-seeker’ dying out?

The concept of the “rent seeker” is one of the most valuable in the whole of economics. The activity of rent-seeking involves obtaining money by manipulating the social or political environment in which economic activity takes place, instead of getting paid for creating new wealth. It is

Read more

Can England win the World Cup?

Autumn is fast approaching. The focus of the nation’s sporting interest is switching. No sooner have our boys humiliated the Australians, than a new challenge emerges in the shape of two important qualifying games for the soccer World Cup. The comedian Bob Doolally articulated the views of many

Read more

Our economic recovery is real, but what we can still learn from the US?

Some people are never satisfied. The evidence is mounting that the UK economy is now on the path to recovery. But to those who denied the possibility of any economic revival at all under the policies of “austerity”, this is simply not good enough. It is the

Read more

How sticky is unemployment? Will it take three years to fall?

The views expressed by the new Bank of England Governor, Mark Carney, on interest rates and unemployment remain a hot topic. Interest rates will not be raised until unemployment falls below 7 per cent, a process he thinks will take three years. The perception which many people have

Read more

No interest rate changes for three years? Zero hours contracts for the Monetary Policy Committee!

The new Governor of the Bank of England, Mark Carney, said last week that interest rates will not be raised until unemployment falls below 7 per cent, a process he thinks will take three years. The battle of Austerlitz in 1805 was one of Napoleon’s greatest victories,

Read more
Page 20 of 26« First...10...1819202122...Last »

Contact Us

56-58 Putney High Street, London, SW15 1SF
Phone: 0208 878 6333
Email

Subscribe to our newsletter

Visit Us On TwitterVisit Us On Linkedin