Need a reason to cut public sector pay and pensions? Look at Jeremy Corbyn

Need a reason to cut public sector pay and pensions? Look at Jeremy Corbyn

The shambles over the treatment of National Insurance has dominated the media’s reporting of the recent Budget. But only the previous week, Jeremy Corbyn made a complete horlicks of his tax return for the second year running.

The Bearded One makes a saintly fuss over making his tax affairs transparent. In 2016, he forgot to include his pensions in his return. This year, he seems to have entered his allowance as leader of the opposition as a benefit rather than as income.

The real scandal is not his gross incompetence. It is the amount he already earns in pensions and is set to receive in the coming years. It is not necessary to be an educational success to earn a lot of money. There are many prominent examples of this point. But, taking the population as a whole, there is a pretty good relationship between how well you do when in education and how much you earn in your career.

Corbyn left school with two grade Es at A level, and left what was then the North London Polytechnic without finishing his degree. His pensions, including his state pension and a pension from the Unison union, already amount to nearly £10,000 a year. When he retires as an MP, he is entitled to a further gold-plated pension which will pay out almost £50,000 annually, which analysis last year estimated would cost £1.6m to buy on the open market.

The leader of the opposition has spent his entire adult life outside the wealth creating sectors of the economy, insulated from market forces. And he will draw a pension which is more than the amount which the vast majority of full time employees are paid by actually working.

It is the continuing problem of public sector pay and pensions which the chancellor should be addressing, rather than fiddling around with the technicalities of National Insurance rates. The howls of anguish should not be from builders and plumbers, but from bureaucrats who find their gold-plated pensions and salaries cut. The public sector pay bill makes up around half of all total public spending, so this is the place to look to reduce the government’s deficit.

A new report by the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) out this week acknowledged that, in raw terms, average hourly wages were about 14 per cent higher in the public sector than that in the private in 2015-16.

The IFS mounted the classic defence of high public sector pay, however, arguing that “after accounting for differences in education, age and experience, this gap falls to about 4 per cent”. In other words, public sector workers are more highly qualified, so their higher pay is justified.

But this takes no account of the outputs of the two sectors. In the old Soviet Union, value was measured solely on the basis of inputs such as the skills of the labour force, and we know what happened there.

A European Central Bank paper from 2011 illustrates the dangers. In Germany, public and private sector pay was more or less equal. In Portugal, Italy, Greece and Spain, public pay was between 20 and 50 per cent higher. Sharpen your axe Mr Hammond!

Paul Ormerod

As published in City AM Wednesday 15th March 2017

Image: Seesaw by Rwendland is licensed under CC by 2.0

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